Android Sdk Download For Mac

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If you’ve ever tried to root your Android phone or flash a ROM, you may have heard about ADB and/or fastboot. These two tools are surprisingly powerful, but can be a bit overly complex to install. Here’s how to do it the easy way.

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Everything You Need to Know About Rooting Your Android Phone
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Update: Google recently released ADB and fastboot as a standalone download. Now you don’t need to download a huge developer kit just to mod you’re phone! We’ve updated our guide below to reflect the changes and to use Google’s official download instead of third-party services.

What are ADB and Fastboot?

These two tools allow you to send terminal commands to your phone from your computer via USB. They both serve different functions, but they can be installed with relative ease at the same time, so it’s helpful to have both. Here’s a (very) brief breakdown on what these tools do:

  • Android Debug Bridge (ADB): This tool allows you to send a wide array of terminal commands—including but not limited to basic Linux shell commands, plus some specialty developer commands—to your phone at just about any time (as long as you have debugging enabled on your phone). You can send commands while the phone is turned on and booted, or even when it’s in recovery mode. While ADB is often used in conjunction with rooting or modifying your phone, you can use ADB to send terminal commands to unrooted devices as well.
  • Fastboot: When you need to modify your phone’s firmware, fastboot is the tool you need. This allows you to send commands to the bootloader, which means you can flash/modify things like custom recoveries. You can’t flash whole ROMs with it, but it’s helpful for many things that ADB can’t do. Fastboot isn’t enabled for all phones, so you may have to check your specific device.

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Both of these tools come with the Android SDK, however that’s an extremely large download that, frankly, most users who are interested in ADB and fastboot don’t need. Fortunately, Google recently made it easy to get these two without all the junk.

Step 1: Download the Platform Tools Package

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Google collectively refers to ADB, fastboot, and a few other utilities as the Platform Tools package. You can download the Platform Tools package from the SDK website here. There are separate packages for Windows, Mac, and Linux so download the appropriate version for your platform.

Once you’ve downloaded the Platform Tools package, extract the contents of the .zip file to a folder you can find later (like “C:Androidplatform-tools”). You don’t actually need to install ADB and fastboot to use them, but you can take an extra step to make them more convenient for you.

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By default, you’ll either have to navigate to the folder where you extracted the Platform Tools package and run any ADB or fastboot command from there, or write out the full path where ADB is every single time you want to run a command. For example, this is a simple command to see what devices are attached to your system:

adb devices

If your command prompt isn’t open to the location where you extracted the Platform Tools, however, you would have to type something like this:

c:Androidplatform-toolsadb.exe devices

That’s a pain to go through every single time you want to tweak something on your phone. To fix this, we can modify something called the PATH variable so that you can run ADB and fastboot commands no matter which folder you’re in.

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Step 2: Edit Your PATH Variable

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The PATH variable is a master list of where to look for command line tools. By default your computer already knows where to find a few really useful tools. Here, we’ll add ADB and fastboot to that list to make it much easier to use them in the future. You’ll need to know where you extracted the Platform Tools package in the last step, so keep that folder location handy.

Windows

Depending on which version of Windows you’re using, these steps may be slightly different. To add ADB to your PATH variable, follow these steps:

  1. Open the Start menu and search for “advanced system settings.”
  2. Click “View advanced system settings.”
  3. Click the box that says “Environment Variables.”
  4. Under “System variables” click on the variable named “Path”.
  5. Click “Edit...”
  6. (Windows 7,8): Add ;[FOLDERNAME] to the end of the “Variable value” box, replacing [FOLDERNAME] with the folder path where you extracted Platform Tools. Be sure to include the semicolon at the beginning so Windows knows you’re adding a new folder.
  7. (Windows 10): Click “New” and paste the folder path where you extracted the Platform Tools. Hit Enter and click OK.

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Now when you want to use ADB or fastboot, simply open a command prompt from the Start Menu and enter your commands.

MacOS/Linux

Editing the macOS and Linux PATH files are a little more complicated than on Windows. However, if you’re comfortable with a command line, it’s still pretty simple. This method will automatically add the location of ADB and fastboot to your PATH every time you log into your system:

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  1. Open up a Terminal window by navigating to Applications/Utilities or searching for it in Spotlight.
  2. Enter the following command to open up your Bash profile: touch ~/.bash_profile; open ~/.bash_profile
  3. The .bash_profile file should open in your default text program.
  4. Add this line to the end of the file: export PATH=”$HOME/[FOLDERNAME]/bin:$PATH” replacing [FOLDERNAME] with the location where you extracted ADB and fastboot.
  5. Save the file and press Cmd+Q to quit your text editor.
  6. In your terminal enter source ~/.bash_profile to run your Bash profile for the first time.

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From now on, any time you open a Terminal window, you can run ADB and fastboot commands from wherever you are.

Build, test, and debug apps for Android

What's new in this version:


Android SDK 29.0.1
- Change log not available for this version

Android SDK 29.0.1
- Change log not available for this version
Android SDK 28.0.2

adb:
- Fixes flakiness of adb shell port forwarding that leads to 'Connection reset by peer' error message
- Fixes authentication via ADB_VENDOR_KEYS when reconnecting devices
- Fixes authentication—when the private key used for authentication does not match the public key—by calculating the public key from the private key, instead of assuming that they match
fastboot:
- Adds support for dynamic partitions.
Updated Windows requirements:
- The platform tools now depend on the Windows Universal C Runtime, which is usually installed by default via Windows Update. If you see errors mentioning missing DLLs, you may need to manually fetch and install the runtime package

Android SDK Release 28.0.1
adb:
- Add support for reconnection of TCP connections. Upon disconnection, adb will attempt to reconnect for up to 60 seconds before abandoning a connection
- Fix Unicode console output on Windows. (Thanks to external contributor Spencer Low!)
- Fix a file descriptor double-close that can occur, resulting in connections being closed when an adb connect happens simultaneously
- Fix adb forward --list when used with more than one device connected
fastboot:
- Increase command timeout to 30 seconds, to better support some slow bootloader commands

Android SDK Release 28.0.0

adb:
- Add support for checksum-less operation with devices running Android P, which improves throughput by up to 40%
- Sort output of adb devices by connection type and device serial
- Increase the socket listen backlog to allow for more simulataneous adb commands
- Improve error output for adb connect
fastboot:
- Improve output format, add a verbose output mode (-v)
- Clean up help output
- Add product.img and odm.img to the list of partitions flashed by fastboot flashall
- Avoid bricking new devices when using a too-old version of fastboot by allowing factory image packages to require support for specific partitions

Android SDK Release 27.0.1
- Android Device Bridge (adb): fixes an assertion failure on MacOS that occurred when connecting devices using USB 3.0
- Fastboot: On Windows, adds support for wiping devices that use F2FS (Flash-Friendly File System)

Android SDK Release 27.0.0
- Re-fixes the macOS 10.13 fastboot bug first fixed in 26.0.1, but re-introduced in 26.0.2

Android SDK Release 26.0.2
- Add fastboot support for Pixel 2 devices
Android SDK Release 26.0.1
- Fixed fastboot problems on macOS 10.13 High Sierra (bug 64292422)
Android SDK Release 26.0.0
- Updated with the release of Android O final SDK (API level 26)

Android SDK 25.2.5
Dependencies:
- Android SDK Platform-Tools revision 24 or later
Android Emulator bug fixes:
- Fixed a crash on async socket reconnect
- Fixed a crash on Mac when glDeleteTextures() is called after the corresponding context was destroyed

Android SDK 25.2.3

Dependencies:
- Android SDK Platform-tools revision 24 or later
- Added new sdkmanager command line tool to view, install, update, and uninstall individual Android SDK packages
New Android Emulator features and bug fixes:
- Fixed -gpu guest (issue 227447)
- Added support for WebP image decoding
- Added support for ETC2 texture decompression

Android SDK 24.4.1

Dependencies:
- Android SDK Platform-tools revision 23 or later.
General Notes:
- Fixed a problem where the emulator title bar was hidden off screen.
- Enabled the emulator to resize the user data partition by including e2fsprogs binaries.
- Fixed a regression on the 32-bit Windows OS where the emulator fails to boot Android 6.0 (API level 23) through Android 5.0 (API level 21) system images.
Android SDK 24.3.4
General Notes:
- Added support for Android 6.0 (API level 23) platform.
Emulator:
- Improved emulator performance on multi-core Windows desktops. (Issue 101040)
- Added support for GPU emulation on Windows and Linux platforms using the -gpu mesa command line option.
- Enabled support for running emulators with GPU emulation through remote desktop services, including Chrome Remote Desktop, Windows Terminal Services, and NoMachine.
- Added support for emulators with 280 dpi and 360 dpi screen resolutions.
- Improved support for GLES 2.0 extensions.
- Fixed several issues with GPU emulation support.
- Added support for setting the storage size on emulators using Android 4.4 (API level 19) and higher. (Issue 75141)
- Fixed problem with sending long SMS messages between emulators. (Issue 3539)
- Fixed issue with emulator getting incorrect time from location objects. (Issue 27272)
- Added handling for unusual characters in paths and file names when starting emulators. (Issue 35889)
Android SDK 24.0.1
Dependencies:
- Android SDK Platform-tools revision 19 or later.
General Notes:
- Fixed issue with creating projects and activities from templates using Eclipse ADT.
Android SDK 24.0.1
Dependencies:
- Android SDK Platform-tools revision 19 or later.
General Notes:
- Fixed Java detection issue on 32-bit Windows systems.
Android SDK 24.0
Dependencies:
- Android SDK Platform-tools revision 19 or later.
General Notes:
- Added support for Andriod Studio 1.0 and emulator enhancements.
Android SDK 23.0.2
Dependencies:
- Android SDK Platform-tools revision 19 or later.
- If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 23.0.2 and later. If you haven't already, update your ADT Plugin to 23.0.2.
- If you are developing outside Eclipse, you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.
General Notes:
- Added ProGuard .bat files that were missing.
- Added the proguard-android.txt file that was missing.
- Renamed the lombok-ast-0.2.2.jar file to lombok-ast.jar, which should allow running lint from the command line
Android SDK 23.0
Dependencies:
- Android SDK Platform-tools revision 19 or later.
- If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 23.0.0 and later. If you haven't already, update your ADT Plugin to 23.0.0.
- If you are developing outside Eclipse, you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.
General Notes:
- Added the Android Wear tools and system images.
Android SDK 22.6.4
Dependencies:
- Android SDK Platform-tools revision 18 or later.
- If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 22.6.3 and later. If you haven't already, update your ADT Plugin to 22.6.3.
- If you are developing outside Eclipse, you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.
General Notes:
- Fixed an issue with the x86 emulator that caused Google Maps to crash. (Issue 69385)
- Fixed minor OpenGL issues.
Android SDK 22.6.3
Dependencies:
- Android SDK Platform-tools revision 18 or later.
- If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 22.6.3 and later. If you haven't already, update your ADT Plugin to 22.6.3.
- If you are developing outside Eclipse, you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.
General Notes:
- Fixed a problem where the AVD manager allowed creating Android Wear virtual devices with a target API Level lower than 19.
- Fixed the description of Android Wear system images in the SDK Manager.
Android SDK 22.6.2
Dependencies:
- Android SDK Platform-tools revision 18 or later.
- If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 22.6.2 and later. If you haven't already, update your ADT Plugin to 22.6.2.
- If you are developing outside Eclipse, you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.
General Notes:
- Fixed a problem where the SDK Manager threw a NullPointerException after removing a virtual device that was created using the Android Wear system image. (Issue 67588)
- Fixed a problem with Nexus 5 Android virtual devices created from the command line where the SD card file system was read-only.
Android SDK 22.6.1
Dependencies:
- Android SDK Platform-tools revision 18 or later.
- If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 22.6.1 and later. If you haven't already, update your ADT Plugin to 22.6.1.
- If you are developing outside Eclipse, you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.
General Notes:
- Fixed a problem where the Android Virtual Device Manager could not create new virtual devices. (Issue 66661)
- Fixed a problem with virtual devices created using ADT 22.3 or earlier.
- If you created an Android Virtual Device using ADT 22.3 or earlier, the AVD may be listed as broken in the AVD Manager in 22.6.1. To fix this problem, select the virtual device on the AVD Manager and click Repair.
- Fixed a problem with the command line tools when creating virtual devices. (Issue 66740)
- Fixed a problem with the command line lint script.
Android SDK 22.6
Dependencies:
- Android SDK Platform-tools revision 18 or later.
- If you are developing in Eclipse with ADT, note that this version of SDK Tools is designed for use with ADT 22.6.0 and later. If you haven't already, update your ADT Plugin to 22.6.0.
- If you are developing outside Eclipse, you must have Apache Ant 1.8 or later.
General Notes:
- The command line lint script (toolslint.bat on Windows platforms, tools/lint on other platforms) and the lint target on ant builds fail with the following error
- Exception in thread 'main' java.lang.NoClassDefFoundError: lombok/ast/AstVisitor
- As a temporary workaround, rename the file toolsliblombok-ast-0.2.2.jar to toolsliblombok-ast.jar. We will release an updated version of the tools with a fix for this issue as soon as possible.
- Added support for Java 7 language features like multi-catch, try-with-resources, and the diamond operator. These features require version 19 or higher of the Build Tools. Try-with-resources requires minSdkVersion 19; the rest of the new language features require minSdkVersion 8 or higher.
- Added new lint checks
Security:
- Look for code potentially affected by a SecureRandom vulnerability.
- Check that calls to checkPermission use the return value.
- Check that production builds do not use mock location providers.
- Look for manifest values that are overwritten by values from Gradle build scripts.
- Fixed a number of minor issues in the SDK and build system.
Emulator
- Fixed a problem with the emulator shutting down immediately for Android 1.5 on the Nexus One and Nexus S devices. (Issue 64945)
- Fixed a problem with port numbers longer than four digits. (Issue 60024)
- Fixed battery errors for the Nexus One and Nexus S devices. (Issue 39959)
- Fixed a problem with paths or arguments that contain spaces on Windows platforms. (Issue 18317)
- Fixed a problem with long path values on Windows platforms. (Issue 33336)
- Fixed a problem with the -snapshot-list command line option on 64-bit systems. (Issue 34233)
- Fixed an issue with RenderScript support. Using RenderScript support mode now requires version 19.0.3 of the Build Tools.
Android SDK 22.3
- Added support for Android 4.4 (API level 19).
- Fixed a number of minor bugs in the SDK and build system.

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